Peer Tutoring as an Effective Instructional Strategy to Promote a Collaborative Environment with Learning as a Social Process to Enhance Reading Achievement: Students as Teachers, Teachers as Facilitators

Starr, Sarah. “Peer Tutoring as an Effective Instructional Strategy to Promote a Collaborative Environment with Learning as a Social Process to Enhance Reading Achievement: Students as Teachers, Teachers as Facilitators.” 2009, Nothern Michigan University.

ABSTRACT

The primary focus of this literature review is to determine if peer tutoring is an
effective instructional strategy to promote a collaborative learning partnership among
peers with students as teachers and teachers as facilitators. Students serve as trained
tutors to create meaningful learning opportunities and increased engagement time in
academics with peer partnerships. Previous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness
of peer tutoring in relation to academic achievement and social impact at the elementary
level. Collaborative learning plays a major role in constructive cognitive development
because learning occurs with interaction of the surrounding environment. Implementation
of a peer-assisted learning model provides an intervention tool for elementary teachers to
promote interactive partnerships that create a more natural learning environment in which
all students take an active role in learning, rather than the more traditional classroom
setup where students can easily become passive learners: students as teachers, teachers as
facilitators.

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